Physical Exams

Annual examinations (or at least twice-yearly for some pets) are the cornerstone of a good preventive care regimen, and preventive care is critical for your pet’s health in order to prevent health problems from occurring or to catch and treat illness earlier – hopefully before it can adversely impact your pet’s quality of life. It is also necessary for the  approval of another year’s worth of heartworm medication, as well as a review of all other medications for yearly prescription renewal. 

​Dental Exams/Cleanings

Regular inspection of your pet’s mouth is important to catch dental disease in the early stages. Tartar may appear as a brownish-gold buildup on the teeth, close to the gumline. Redness or bleeding along the gumline may indicate gingivitis. A professional dental cleaning removes not only the visible plaque and tartar on the teeth surfaces but also the bacteria under the gums. This eliminates potential sources of infection to the mouth and other organs and protects your pet from pain and tooth loss.

​Bloodwork

​Our clinic offers a wide range of in house bloodwork options to diagnose, treat, and help keep your pet healthy. We can provide pre-anesthesia panels to complete blood counts within a matter of minutes. We can also provide outside lab services for those more in-depth blood tests and have results within 1-2 business days. 

​General Surgery

​General surgeries are performed two days a week in our clinic. Although all surgical procedures carry some risks, spaying and neutering are the most common surgeries performed in dogs and cats, and most pets handle the surgery very well. Be sure to follow instructions regarding withholding food and water before surgery. Your pet will need to stay at the hospital anywhere from a few hours to a few days, depending on his or her age, size, sex, and condition. Spaying and neutering also have immediate benefits for you and your pet: Your pet will be much less likely to get a number of serious health problems that can be life-threatening and expensive to treat, such as uterine, mammary (breast), or testicular cancer.

Services

 

X-Rays

A radiograph (sometimes called an x-ray) is a type of photograph that reveals the body’s bones and internal organs. The procedure for obtaining a radiograph is called radiography. Radiography is a very useful diagnostic tool for veterinarians because it can help obtain information about almost any organ in the body, including the heart, lungs, and abdominal organs, as well as the bones.



​Vaccinations

​Vaccination decisions should always be made in consultation with a veterinarian so they can be tailored to meet a pet’s individual needs. According to the American Animal Hospital Association’s (AAHA) vaccine guidelines, the following vaccines are considered “core” (indispensable) vaccines for all dogs in the United States:

Rabies virus
Canine distemper virus
Canine adenovirus-2 (hepatitis)
Canine parvovirus

For puppies, the rabies vaccine should be administered as a single dose as early as three months of age. For adults (dogs 16 weeks or older) receiving an initial rabies vaccine, one dose is considered protective. For all dogs, a second dose one year after the initial vaccine is recommended. Following that, the vaccine should be administered every one to three years, depending on the product’s labeling.

For the canine distemper virus vaccine, canine adenovirus-2 vaccine, and canine parvovirus vaccine, puppies should receive a minimum of three doses between the ages of 6 and 16 weeks, administered at three- to four-week intervals. Should the initial vaccination take place after 16 weeks, two vaccines three to four weeks apart are recommended. Puppies should receive a booster one year after vaccination and then at intervals of every three years or longer.

The following vaccines are considered non-core, which is to say they are optional vaccines that dogs can benefit from based on risk for exposure to the diseases in question:

Bordetella (kennel cough vaccine)
Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi vaccine)
Leptospirosis


According to the American Association of Feline Practitioners’ vaccination guidelines, the following vaccines are considered “core” (indispensable) vaccines for all cats in the United States:

Rabies virus
Panleukopenia virus (FPV)
Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1)
Feline calicivirus (FCV)

For kittens, the rabies vaccine should be administered as a single dose as early as 12 weeks of age (depending on vaccine type and label recommendations). For adults receiving an initial rabies vaccine, one dose is considered protective. For all cats, a second dose one year after the initial vaccine is recommended. Following that, the vaccine should be administered every one to three years, depending on the product’s labeling.

The panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), and feline calicivirus (FCV) vaccines are typically administered as a combination vaccine according to the following schedule: All kittens should receive two vaccinations three to four weeks apart between the ages of 6 and 16 weeks. Should the initial vaccination take place after 16 weeks, two vaccines three to four weeks apart are recommended. All kittens should receive a booster one year after vaccination and then at intervals of every three years.

The following vaccine is considered “non-core,” which is to say it is an optional vaccine that cats can benefit from based on their risk for exposure to the diseases in question:

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV)